Theosophical Living By Sharon Ann Meyer (aka SAM)

The Theosophical Society was brought into being to change the hearts of men toward kindliness and brotherhood, compassion and pity, and to infuse into men’s souls a hunger for a greater Light. As past President of the Theosophical Society, Annie Besant, tells us, “Theosophy is full of the greatest possibilities of happiness, and gives to each one of us that which to some of us seems to be the most priceless of gifts: it renders life intelligible, and it brightens it with an eternal Hope.” During her lecture delivered in 1911, she also noted: “Many of us practice this mode of living in and relating to the world by assisting in the relief of suffering within humanity. And by joining hands within a common organization we are able to share much more fully, as a cohesive unit of one living and walking the talk of what H.P. Blavatsky termed as ‘Theosophy’ in 1875.”

According to G. de Purucker, author of the Series of Esoteric Instructions, “Theosophy is the highest law of conduct, the enacted expression of divine love or compassion to bring down more of the Light to the aid of all that lives.” Furthermore, he notes, “It is easy to become a Theosophist. Any person of average intellectual capacities, and a leaning toward the meta-physical; of pure, unselfish life, who finds more joy in helping his neighbour than in receiving help himself; one who is ever ready to sacrifice his own pleasures for the sake of other people; and who loves Truth, Goodness and Wisdom for their own sake, not for the benefit they may confer – is a Theosophist.” Theosophy calms evil passions, kills hatred and it stimulates love. Upon entering the vast field of Theosophy we may gather the fruits of that Divine Wisdom.

H.P. Blavatsky, noted in THE KEY TO THEOSOPHY that the fundamental teaching of Theosophy can be stated as: “All men have spiritually and physically the same origin. As mankind is essentially of one and the same essence, and that essence is one–infinite, uncreate, and eternal, whether we call it God or Nature– nothing, therefore, can affect one nation or one man without affecting all other nations and all other men.” The most important of all aims of Theosophy are those which are likely to lead to the relief of suffering under any and every form, moral as well as physical. Upon forming the Theosophical Society, Blavatsky envisioned one Universal Brotherhood, with “full recognition of equal rights and privileges for all, and without distinction of race, color, social position, or birth.” And she noted, “Our duty is to keep alive in man his spiritual intuitions.”

Theosophy is a way of life, a universal fundamental system which underlies the religions of every age. W. Q. Judge tells us that the New Testament teaches Theosophy, and both Jesus and St. Paul were initiates. Utopia, he said, can be established through the spreading of the idea of Universal Brotherhood.

G. de Purucker relayed: “It is a great and inspiring thought to realize that back of all the worry and tribulation and heartache and sorrow of the world there is a HAVEN OF PEACE, A GREAT CENTER OF LIGHT, sheltered and protected, safeguarded through the ages, and that this great Center is our own spiritual Home.

 

Sources
G. de Purucker, II THE ESOTERIC OR ORIENTAL SCHOOL: STEPS IN THE INITIATORY CYCLE, 1987.
Annie Besant, A SKETCH OF THEOSOPHY, Lecture delivered on July 6, 1911
G. de Purucker, I THE ESOTERIC PATH: ITS NATURE AND ITS TESTS, 1987.
Annie Besant and C. W. Leadbeater, Thought-Forms, 1901.
H.P. Blavatsky, THE KEY TO THEOSOPHY, 1889.
Jasper Niemand, Compiler, LETTERS THAT HAVE HELPED ME: Volume 2, June 1905 (1st Edition) William Q. Judge.

Sharon Ann Meyer (aka SAM) is the Theosophical Society In Miami & South Florida Corresponding Secretary. Find more about her along with various tools and resources at SAM I AM PROductions.